Elizabeth Inchbald. A Simple Story

Tompkins J. M. S.

в наличии

Цена со скидкой 20% в интернет-магазине: 383,20 руб.

ISBN: 978-0-19-955472-0
Внешнее покрытие издания: в обл.
Язык текста: англ.
Фамилия автора в заголовке: Tompkins
Инициалы автора (личного имени (имен)): J. M. S.
Код отношений (роль соавтора в издании): 070 Автор
Основное заглавие: Elizabeth Inchbald. A Simple Story
Первые сведения об ответственности: J. M. S. Tompkins
Издатель: Oxford University Press
Дата издания: 2009
Объем издания (количество страниц): 345
Высота, см.: 20
Определитель УДК: =021
Индекс УДК: 821.111
Статус записи (Тип информации): В наличии
Ширина, см: 12,8
Толщина, см: 1,7
Вес в граммах: 265
Артикул: 1921159

Описание

Born on 15 October 1753 at Standingfield, near Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, Elizabeth was the eighth of the nine children of John Simpson (died 1761), a farmer, and his wife Mary, nee Rushbrook. The family, like several others in the neighbourhood was Roman Catholic. Elizabeth was educated with her sisters at home. At the age of 19 she went to London in order to act. (Her brother George had become an actor in 1770.) Young and alone, she was apparently the victim of sexual harassment.[2] In 1772 she agreed to marry a fellow Catholic, the actor Joseph Inchbald (1735–1779), possibly at least partially for protection. The marriage was reported to have had difficulties. For four years the couple toured Scotland with West Digges's theatre company, a demanding life. In 1776 they moved to Liverpool and Inchbald met actors Sarah Siddons and her brother John Philip Kemble, both of whom became important friends. The Inchbalds subsequently moved to Canterbury and Yorkshire. After Joseph Inchbald's death in 1779, Inchbald continued to act for several years, in Dublin, London, and elsewhere. Her acting career, while only moderately successful, spanned seventeen years and she appeared in many classical roles, as well as in new plays such as Hannah Cowley's The Belle's Stratagem. Between 1784 and 1805 she had nineteen of her comedies, sentimental dramas, and farces (many of which were translations from the French) performed at London theatres. Eighteen of her plays were published, though she wrote several more; the exact number is in dispute though most recent commentators claim between 21 and 23. Her two novels have been frequently reprinted. She also did considerable editorial and critical work. Her literary start began with writing for The Artist and Edinburgh Review.[3] A four-volume autobiography was destroyed before her death upon the advice of her confessor, but she left some of her diaries. The latter are currently held at the Folger Shakespeare Library and an edition was recently published. Her play Lovers' Vows (1798) was featured by Jane Austen in her novel Mansfield Park.